3601 McDonough Street, Joliet, IL 60431

Call Us815-727-0100

McNamara Phelan McSteen, LLC
Recent blog posts

Will County criminal defense attorneyThe terms “assault” and “battery” often go hand in hand, which may cause someone to think it is one crime. However, they are separate offenses according to Illinois criminal law. Under the Illinois Criminal Code, criminal charges are divided into two groups: offenses against property, and offenses against a person. Crimes against property can be in the form of robbery, burglary, theft, and arson. Crimes against individuals can include kidnapping, sexual abuse/assault, homicide, and “bodily harm.” Assault and battery fall under bodily harm, and the penalties can differ depending on the circumstances of the case.

Two Distinct Crimes

Illinois law states that an assault occurs when an individual “engages in intentional conduct which places another in reasonable apprehension of receiving a battery.” That includes a verbal or implied threat (menacing hand gestures or body language) of battery that causes an individual to feel afraid of impending violence. Approaching someone with raised or clenched fists is likely to be considered assault. 

Battery is committed when a person “intentionally or knowingly causes bodily harm to an individual,” or “makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature with an individual.” Acts that constitute battery can include pushing, striking, kicking another person, or throwing an object at someone, resulting in injury.

...

Will County workers compensation attorneysLaw enforcement and firefighting professionals face danger on a regular basis. Their jobs are to protect and save citizens, even if that means putting themselves in peril. This means injuries can be prevalent for individuals in these occupations, especially due to the physical nature of their duties. In certain situations, workers’ compensation benefits can be claimed if one of these workers suffers an injury on the job. In Illinois, first responders can file for workers’ comp benefits, with exceptions for police and firefighters employed by the City of Chicago. 

Common First Responder Injuries 

Police officers have a greater chance of incurring a work-related injury or illness than those in many other occupations. Nonfatal injuries and illnesses that cause officers to miss work may be the result of violence, animal attacks, or even falls while on duty. For example, when serving search warrants, an officer could face a suspect who pulls a gun or a knife. A suspect could also be combative by hitting, kicking, or shooting at law enforcement. Other cause of injury may include vehicle collisions while patrolling the roadways. When making a traffic stop, an offender may try to evade or elude police, which sends the officer on a high-speed chase, which could result in a crash. 

Some of the typical injuries sustained by law enforcement officials include:

...

Will County weapons violations attorneysWith limited exceptions, every United States citizen has the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms. According to Illinois’ Concealed Carry Act, a person must obtain a permit in order to carry a gun in public. In addition, gun owners must have a Firearm Owner’s Identification Card (FOID).

Unlawful of a Weapon (UUW) is a serious crime in Illinois. If a person is arrested for having a gun in public, and he or she does not have a Concealed Carry Permit, the charge is UUW. If an individual does not have a FOID Card or if the gun was loaded, he or she will be charged with an Aggravated UUW. Both charges could result in hefty fines and jail time if convicted. It is important for gun owners to understand what constitutes the unlawful use of a weapon.

Punishments for UUW Offenses

Illinois law provides the definitions, offenses, and penalties pertaining to UUW charges in the state. While many violations of this statute are classified as misdemeanors, an offender could face felony charges depending on the circumstances. 

...

Joliet personal injury attorneysFor some people, enjoying a Ferris wheel, merry-go-round, roller-coaster, or other ride is the highlight of a trip to an amusement park or fair. For others, just the thought of riding one of these rides is enough to put knots in their stomach. While the vast majority of amusement park, carnival, and fair rides are completely safe, accidents do happen. Sometimes a ride glitches because it has not been properly maintained. Other times, a ride operator makes a mistake and causes a malfunction.

 Whatever the reason, ride accidents are usually horrifying for the individuals on the ride as well as spectators watching from the ground. When negligent design, manufacture, construction, or operation is the cause of a ride accident which causes injury or death, a personal injury lawsuit can help recover damages.

Broken Track Being Blamed for Roller-Coaster Breakdown

An Illinois woman is reportedly out of the hospital after falling from a roller-coaster last month. The 45-year-old woman was attending the Plainfield Fest carnival when she decided to ride a roller coaster called the Iron Dragon. Another passenger on the Iron Dragon said, “Things started to feel really unstable. It felt like we sloped inward and crashed down… I saw a woman fly by me.”  Fortunately, the woman only fell about five feet. She was treated at a local hospital and released the same day. The accident is currently being investigated by the Illinois Department of Labor, Amusement Ride and Attraction Safety Division.

...

Joliet traffic violations attorneyEvery motorist is responsible for driving safely and following the rules of the road. Statistics show that almost all U.S. drivers have been or will be pulled over by law enforcement at least once in their lifetime for a traffic violation. The fact that these violations are fairly common should not mean they should be taken lightly. Any act that breaks the law is serious, and a moving violation has the potential to cause other drivers or pedestrians harm.

Moving Versus Non-Moving Violations

It is important for all drivers to understand the difference between a non-moving and a moving violation. A non-moving violation is just like it sounds; the offense committed was at a time when the vehicle was stopped or parked. If a car is in motion when the driver commits a traffic violation, that is considered a moving violation. 

Examples of non-moving violations include parking in a handicap space without proper license plates or signage; stopping in a no-stop zone, or having an expired vehicle registration or license. Under Illinois law, many traffic offenses are considered moving violations, which carry stiffer penalties compared to non-moving traffic violations. Moving violations include but are not limited to:

...
Will County Bar Association Illinois State Bar Association Lions Minooka AV 2019 Rotary DuPage County Bar Association
Back to Top